Review: Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

In Leni Zumas’ novel “Red Clocks,” Congress has just passed the Personhood Amendment, outlawing In Vitro Fertilization and abortion in an America eerily like our own. The novel weaves together the lives of… Continue reading

Spring Reprints: Week 3 pt. 2

The security camera at Morrison’s Party Rentals is lonely. Its job is to document its own solitude. Or its job is to enforce its own solitude, and the record of this job becomes… Continue reading

Spring Reprints: Week 3

The cacti are letting go. Nobody is quite sure why, or if there’s anything we can do about it. The news websites say it’s the whole cactus family. Their root systems are disintegrating.… Continue reading

Spring Reprints: Week 2 Pt. 2

June in Ventura is a gloomy month. The fog creeps in from the ocean and stretches its fingers inland, settling in the creases of the hills, the spaces between office buildings, the narrow… Continue reading

Spring Reprint: Week 2 Pt. 1

Where the river meets rock and dirt, bone and blood and fire, you will find the abyss. You might sense a creeping monstrosity that inches in the spectrum of light outside of human… Continue reading

Spring Reprint: Week 1 Pt. 2

It is just past sunset when we breach, Husband and I. But breaching only delivers us from the dirt; it takes more light than the yellowed haze of dusk to pull ourselves fully… Continue reading

Spring Reprints: Week 1 Pt. 1

The first story of our 2018 digital reprints is “The Potato” by Rachel Luria.

2018 Contest Results

Below you’ll find our 2018 Psychopomp Magazine Short Fiction Award winners and runners up, along with brief notes from our judge, Anne Valente, about the first, second, and third place stories. We look… Continue reading

Review: Ventriloquisms by Jaclyn Watterson

Understanding the Abstracted: A Look into Jaclyn Watterson’s “Ventriloquisms” “By the time he’s dead, delicacy, like high-heeled shoes, is a vector, and–no surprise–ventriloquism is no longer a form of self-expression. Stick a feather,… Continue reading

Review: Ottessa Moshfegh (Homesick for Another World and Eileen)

If you want to look beyond carefully censored stories that operate within the bounds of social niceties, then Ottessa Moshfegh’s writing is for you. Unapologetically raw, honest, and maybe, just maybe, too familiar… Continue reading